Tuesday, June 14, 2011

The garden in early June


I'm a little late getting these pictures posted.  It just amazes me how much the garden has grown in one week.  I'll update the pictures in a week or so.  But all the heat and rain have caused the garden to triple in size (or so it seemed) since these were taken.

Either that or there was some radioactive ray gun aimed at them... or perhaps I've watched to many SciFy Channel marathons lately.

Those are marigolds and zinnias at the end of the raised beds, an idea I swiped read from Manuela's lovely blog.  Actually, I steal get a lot of ideas from her for house and garden.


I should go through my pictures and show the timeline of our raised bed garden, which was built entirely when we had "a little extra" money to work with.

The first spring, hubby built the fence and two raised beds (the small bed for the herb garden and the first rectangle bed).  Then later the same season, he built the second two raised beds, which look like one long rectangle in the pictures.


This year we were hoping to extend the garden but didn't have enough funds to accomplish it... so we concentrated on purchasing a few much needed support structures (purchased with a surprise gift from a friend).  If there is one thing I've learned these past few years, many veggies really need those supports to grow properly.

Those very tall red tomato cages came from Lowes, who has them in multiple colors.  I'm hoping they provide better structure than the smaller size cages I have been using.  I'm also trying the green structures shown, one for a tomato plant and the other for a cucumber plant.


This year, he also built another raised bed structure in a corner of the raised bed which was not being used.  He spent part of yesterday taking our wheelbarrow to the dry creek bed in the forest for soil.

The owner of that property gave him permission when we first built the raised bed to take the soil (free soil helps a lot).   As you can tell from the above picture, we still need to budget for mulch on the ground!

We add compost to the soil when possible.  This year I used an organic fertilizer in two of the beds (I'd already planted the green beans when I bought it).  Since we use soil from the dry creek bed, we do have to hoe the weeds quite regularly but I have this wonderful old hoe that is perfect for a raised bed garden and I actually enjoy getting out early in the morning and attacking those weeds.  It's easy when they are tiny... 


The structure has been keeping out critters so far.  It is very simple, as you can tell from the "gate".

I love the way the garden is looking these days.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks great! We have a similar set up and use wood chips on top of cardboard for the paths. We gathered cardboard from everyone and every store we could and then stopped and asked a tree trimming service to dump a load of chips in our driveway. It was ALOT of chips but we gave away what we didn't use. All for free! Dee

Mrs.Rabe said...

Last year I grew nasturtiums in our tomato plant bed and we had very little bug problems, plus the nasturtiums are edible so on occasion we threw some of the pretty flowers on our salads!

I love beautifying even practical things....

Your garden looks great!

Deanna

Vee said...

It does look wonderful. Soil is so expensive...you're blessed to have a source...is there something more nutritive about soil from the creek bed? We are so blessed to have some cheap mulch available...that stuff is pricey...if we ever find time to go get it.

matty said...

So pretty! I love it!

Anonymous said...

Your garden looks so healthy. Thanks for the tip about planting nasturtiums Mrs. Rabe. I'm going to try it in our garden.

Christy@WickedHappy said...

Lovely!!!

young-eclectic-encounters said...

My garden got put back some this spring and we also add to as we can. I am glad I have a second season coming up so maybe I can make up for the late start and some barren beds from the delay.
Your garden looks wonderful- keep up the good work
Johnina

freetobeme - Anita said...

It looks so good...if only we had more sun...

Kristi in the Western Reserve said...

I think good gardeners are very generous and happy to share any of their ideas with others! Isn't is a wonderful feeling to look at your garden. (Rhetorical question!) I wish you the joys of a great harvest, even in this year of strange weather. I got free woodchips one year from a tree service and didn't use them right away and when I did the mold that had developed made me terribly sick the night after I used them. I thought I couldn't breathe. But it was my fault for not using it right away, I think. Using soil from the creekbed makes me think of the way the Nile floods every year (I assume it still does) and fertilized the soil. It should be very good soil, but it might be a little on the acid side. However, your garden looks very exciting and good to me!

Planting my little deck is finally finished and I have some cherry tomatoes and lots of herbs out there besides flowers. But I have trouble using all the veggies from the CSA farm I belong to so I think I'm growing enough.

Anonymous said...

What a nice garden!! And so nice we live in the information age so we can learn more HOW-TO!! Maybe one year I will get set up something like you are...changes ahead for us and maybe ere long however. Hubby hopes to get into gardening once he retires...and if we work together we might actually accomplish something!
Blessings, Elizabeth in NC