Sunday, July 20, 2008

Explanation

Jenny, I'm sorry you were offended by what I wrote in the last Sunday Afternoon Tea. The challenge of writing in blog format (or as part of an online community or forum) is in trying to communicate within the context of using words when, if we really were sitting down and having tea together, we would be using body language as well as interrupting each other to further explain what we are saying.

I actually was more concerned that readers would think I was putting down people who live in big houses and drive fancy cars. Not at all! We are all in different seasons of our lives as well as a variety of income levels. I have had plenty and I have had nothing and everything in between. I can't say I am overjoyed with dropping below the poverty level but I am... curious... as to how it is going to turn out.

I certainly know not all Baby Boomers were raised to be materialistic. It is just that, as a trend in society, many turned out this way. Oh, the parents never said they were raising their children to be materialistic. It usually came out in such a way as to say they wanted their children to have an education they never had so they had more "options". Those options hit the perfect storm of advertising and a post WWII economic boom in most of the Western world which resulted in materialism for many.

All I am writing about is the importance of being content with what we have been given. Without contentment, one could have millions of dollars and it would never be enough. I'm not sure I'm explaining this correctly as I am tired and my brain is rather fuzzy but I wanted to make certain you knew that was never my intent. I certainly never meant to imply all Baby Boomers are not grateful.

7 comments:

nanatrish said...

Brenda, Thanks for dropping by. I guess I just missed that whole thing about the check. Again, I am sorry and thank the Lord you are such a dilligent planner and have deepened your pantry so well. I think learning to be content is a huge lesson and I believe you come across as humble and are trying to teach some of us that have made some bad choices to learn how to make better choices. You never offend me. I take everything you say as a lesson that is like a gem. I will continue praying for you. Please pray for me, too. Love ya, Trish

lady jane said...

Beautifully written. :o)

Patty said...

Well said...as always.

*carrie* said...

Brenda,

I enjoyed reading this post. We just bought our first home, which happens to be *bigger* than the one we moved from. Sometimes I worry about others' perceptions that it might be "too big". We love the house--it's 99 years old and has so much character--and we bought the house not for its size but for what it offered--good layout and location, and in our (modest) price range.

my house by the river said...

Dear Brenda, unfortunately, the world's thinking has always been the bigger the better. Having moved from a Mc-mansion myself, I know that contentment doesn't come from where you live but your identity in Christ.

Well said dear friend.

blessings,

mari

~~Deby said...

I have been in my 900+ sq. foot home for almost 3 years..and it has been a process of learning contentment...and do you know, I have personally been looked down upon by some Christians for our downsized standard of living...it has been rough at times and I share very little...but Brenda..just keep, keeping it real, as I feel you do..we ALL need to hear it....
Deby

Rita said...

Deby said it just right. I also live in a smaller home and feel the same things. For you to keep it real is important to me. You write so well and Jeremiah 6:16 When I am not sure which way to turn I am reminded again by the scripture you use on this blog.